Category Archives: Ethics

Melania writer sues over paper’s ‘libelous’ apology

An American journalist issued the Daily Telegraph with a writ for libel after it published a lengthy apology for “errors” in her article about Melania Trump. Nina Burleigh’s writ accused the Telegraph Media Group of “capitulating abjectly” to a legal threat from a lawyer known as a “slayer”, and had wrongly turned her into “a poster girl for fake news”.

The writ detailed how the paper apologised – without consulting her – for statements the article did not contain, and for fact-checked and well-sourced material. It gave a detailed breakdown showing how the apology allegedly misquoted the original article.

Read the writ here.

Advertisements

Unbalanced: radio host’s ‘mental hospital’ jibes

Talkradio host George Galloway earned a heavy rebuke for a “biased and unbalanced” show on the Salisbury poisoning affair. Ofcom found “serious breaches” of the broadcasting code. People who disagreed with his “dissident” views were dismissed as inmates of Broadmoor Hospital, which houses criminals with mental illness. Ofcom said Galloway’s fame as a radical did not exempt it from having to achieve due impartiality. Read more.

Mail Online balks at accuracy alert app

An app warned users going to the Mail Online website that it failed to maintain “basic standards of accuracy and accountability”. Mail Online called for the app’s removal from Microsoft’s Edge browser. Note: we’re not told the basis of claims of inaccuracy; simply that Mail Online didn’t respond to queries from analyists working for the app – hence the reference to accountability? Read more ¬†(source: BBC).

Responsible Media blog’s handy link to judgments

The International Forum for Responsible Media blog publishes lists of important judgments. Here’s an example.

Among the links is one to the Daily Telegraph’s attempt to be allowed to reveal the identity of a business executive accused of sexual harrassment, but protected by non-disclosure agreements. Confidentiality was protected but the executive was revealed in parliament to be Philip Green.

Who regulates online video? And social media?

As of the middle of 2018, there was no regulator for social media in the UK, noted the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) in its blog on 13 July 2018. A tricky topic: is it really feasible to regulate the content of individual users? Can platforms realistically keep on top of all the content?

Across the European Union, TV and on-demand video is regulated under the Audio Visual Media Services Directive (known as the AVMS Directive). In Britain the actual work of regulating broadcast and on-demand is carried out by Ofcom.

At the start of 2019, video on newspaper and magazine websites was not regulated by Ofcom: it fell under the ambit of the print and online regulators – IPSO for most publishers. The same was true for online-only publications signed up to IPSO.

The EU could change that.

Proliferation of multi-media content meant “newspaper websites could, in theory, start to resemble video-sharing platforms,” said the IPSO blog.

But this website notes that the ethical codes for newspaper sites are nowhere near as demanding as for broadcast media.

Read the full IPSO blog post here.