Category Archives: Press regulation

Paper failed to check harassment claims

A newspaper failed to contact a woman’s ex-partner when she claimed he had harassed her and was subject to a court order, because it was concerned for her safety. IPSO found against the paper on grounds of accuracy, but not for breach of privacy. Note that the main interest here for journalism students in England and Wales is with the Editor’s Code – Northern Ireland has its own laws. Read more

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IPSO gives advice on transgender stories

The rapid evolution of transgender issues prompted the Independent Press Standards Organisation to issue special guidance for journalists. Nearly all parts of the Editor’s Code might come into play. Journalists should ask whether the subject has made their transgender status public, and whether they have applied for formal recognition. Gender identity should only be mentioned if specifically relevant to the story, says IPSO. Read the guidance here.

Note: this story was uploaded to Media Law Matters before the implementation of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation directive, which toughens up data protection law, from May 2018. 

IPSO mark counters threat to public trust

The Independent Press Standards Organisation launched the IPSO mark in late 2017, to be displayed by the 2,500 newspapers and magazines it regulates. It has the strapline, “For press freedom with responsibility”. With the rise of “fake news” undermining public trust in journalism, the symbol would declare that publications were properly edited to professional standards, said the regulator, here.

IPSO arbitration means max £100 to complain

The Independent Press Standards Organisation introduced an arbitration scheme in November 2017, as urged by the Leveson Report, to enable members of the public to complain against publications without the prohibitive expense of going to court. Complaints cost £50 up front and another £50 if they go to a final ruling; but publishers found “guilty” face paying out up to £50,000 (still far less than a libel case might cost). Complaints under the Editor’s Code remain free. Read more from IPSO here.

IPSO gives tips on use of social media

Pictures and information may be considered private even if posted on sites such as Facebook, says new guidance from the Independent Press Standards Organisation on sourcing material from social media. It highlights issues of accuracy, privacy, children and grief under the Editors’ Code.  Read the full guidance, with case studies and examples of rulings, here.